Here, the process send SIGUSR1 signal to itself using kill() function. getpid() is used to get the process ID of itself. In the next example we will see how parent and child processes communicates (Inter Process Communication) using kill() and signal function. Parent Child Communication with Signals

kill(2) Sends a signal to a SIGUSR1 P1990 Term User-defined signal 1 SIGUSR2 P1990 Term User-defined signal 2 SIGVTALRM P2001 Term Virtual alarm clock (4.2BSD Can a kill -SIGUSR1 cause a process to crash? 1-800-477-6473 Ready to Talk? the script will print "TRAPPED" when you send the signal USR1 to it with the kill command. So the answer to the last question is: Evidently, the "tint2" program has code that, upon receiving the signal USR1, will reload its configuration file. Session hangs after issuing repeated kill SIGUSR1 signals to an ABL client process An incomplete protrace file is generated, or no protrace at all. Using gstack (part of gdb debugger package) to obtain a stack dump for the hanging process which shows OS localtime() and related ctime functions on the stack. You may also rotate the logs by sending a SIGUSR1 signal to the mongod process. If your mongod has a process ID of 2200, copy. kill-SIGUSR1 2200. Behavior Oct 05, 2017 · SIGUSR1 signal is sent to the mongod process and performs log rotation. Another way doing log rotation is to enter mongo console by typing 'mongo' in command line. Then in database console execute Feb 04, 2014 · $ kill 1212 1313 1414 Type the following command to send KILL single to multiple pids: $ kill -9 1212 1313 1414. How do I specify the signal to send to PID # 4242? Pass the -s option to given the signal as a signal number or a signal name. The syntax is: $ kill -s signal pid To send stop/suspend signal for pid # 4242, enter: $ kill -s stop 4242

Re: Kill doesn't send SIGUSR1 Maybe it should, but in your example it seems not to. If you send the same signal from a wide variety of sources, and you are recieving it in only one destination, and you observe the signal is not making the full trip - why conclude that *all* sources are failing?

Although most commonly we’re using kill -9 and kill -15, there are a few more really useful signals that you should know about. We’ll use in place of a numeric process ID that will be specific to your needs. [Most Useful kill signals in Unix][kill-signals] SIGHUP (kill -1) SIGINT (kill -2) SIGQUIT (kill -3) SIGKILL (kill -9) SIGUSR1 (kill -10) User-defined signals: SIGQUIT, SIGABRT, SIGUSR1, SIGUSR2, SIGTERM. Each signal is represented by an integer value, and the list of signals that are available is comparably long and not consistent between the different UNIX/Linux variants. On a Debian GNU/Linux system, the command kill -l displays the list of signals as follows:

Special behavior for C++: If a thread is sent a signal using pthread_kill() and that thread does not handle the signal, then destructors for local objects may not be executed. Usage notes. The SIGTHSTOP and SIGTHCONT signals can be issued by this function. pthread_kill() is the only function that can issue SIGTHSTOP or SIGTHCONT. Returned value

Re: Kill doesn't send SIGUSR1 Maybe it should, but in your example it seems not to. If you send the same signal from a wide variety of sources, and you are recieving it in only one destination, and you observe the signal is not making the full trip - why conclude that *all* sources are failing?